SEO Translator

How to optimize your web site translation for the search engines!

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Excerpt: I highlighted in the previous post (Basic Research in Language Recognition) some of the academic research that is taking place and that provides the groundwork for language recognition and identification by the search engines. But why is the recognition of the language in web pages so difficult? Machines don’t “understand” a language. Machines are stupid. Even so-called artificial intelligence is light-years away from the intelligence of a 5-year old. Any human being that knows how to read can immediately identify the languages he speaks, and often also others. But machines –and search engines are just that– need to be programmed to analyze…

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Excerpt: One of the advantages of being an IT professional as well as a translator is that as part of my IT duties I try to keep ahead of the wave and therefore keep an eye of state-of-the-art research. This, obviously, means having a subscription in professional societies such as the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) or the IEEE Computer Society, as well as reading the content of their digital libraries as well as their publications. I also keep an eye on the most relevant SEO blogs and forums and of course on the Google webmaster blog. So I stumbled on several…

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Excerpt: One interesting thing, which is almost never considered, is the fact that error pages very often will pop up in the original site language. Why? Because the webmaster never thought about it in the first place. Now, from the user experience point of view, this is not exactly thrilling. Imagine that you are navigating a localized French page, and you get a 404 error (Page not found) in English. The user might not understand English in the first place, and he might not even know what a 404 error is. Will he click the page back to where he was? Will…

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Excerpt: One question that one of my customers raised on one occasion was where he should store his localized web pages. In his root directory, together with the pages on the original language? In a subdirectory? Or perhaps in a subdomain? I admit that at first I was thinking about what  a stupid question that was, but then I realized that it was not so stupid at all. And many webmasters will have to face this question repeatedly, so I penned it down as the subject for a future post. Well, the time for such post has come. Root directory The root directory…

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Excerpt: Ready to translate your website? Do you want a real international presence? And then want to mess up big, and I mean really big, at international level? Look no further: Here’s the fool-proof recipe for total and complete site localization disaster. Any of these will guarantee to really mess up your translated site, but any combination will provide you with certain disaster. For a cataclysm of cosmic proportions, make sure you follow all of them to the letter. Translate the site yourself, or let your cousin do it. Your (his) high-school knowledge of that language is more than enough. Why…