SEO Translator

How to optimize your web site translation for the search engines!

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Excerpt: OK, so you’ve translated your website, performed your multinational SEO, building localized links, and are ready to test the results. But why is your French page not popping up in Google? You did everything there is in the book, yet the results fail to come. Disaster! Well, perhaps not. The issue might be that you are looking into the “wrong” Google! Surprised? You should not be. Google identifies your location, and the language of your browser, perhaps also your language preferences in Google Webmaster, and tries to localize the result for you. So, if you are based in the US or…

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Excerpt: Trados Tageditor is a tool that has been widely used for website translation. I own it myself since 2003, and have upgraded through the different versions (if there was such, I did not notice almost any difference between the two or three last upgrades) so I by now I am quite familiar with it. TagEditor disappeared with the new SDL Trados 2009, but it is still widely used by translators. There is a lot of information about it on the web, but little is commented about how and whether it is really adequate for website translation. Yes, TagEditor can handle part…

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Excerpt: In previous posts I discussed Basic Research in Language Recognition, the Difficulty of Language Identification and How Search Engines Recognize the Language of Your Pages.This might be very interesting, but the point is that you WANT search engines to properly recognize the language in which your site is written. Why is this important? I also wrote a post about what will happen if your website language is not recognized. So we finally come to the core of the problem: How do we ensure that the search engines recognize the language of our original and localized pages? Because if your translation is…

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Excerpt: In the previous post (Language Identification is difficult) I highlighted how difficult it could be to identify a language. Yet Google does it somehow: it has over 160 domains, and Google allows restricting user results to pages in 117 languages, so “somehow” it must be able to “understand” into which languages these pages must be. Based on the literature and the hints found in places such as Google’s Webmaster Central, search engines seem to use a variety of methods to detect the language of your web pages. Meta-tag. Ok, Google ignores this, but other search engines (such as Yahoo!) will recognize  the…

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Excerpt: I highlighted in the previous post (Basic Research in Language Recognition) some of the academic research that is taking place and that provides the groundwork for language recognition and identification by the search engines. But why is the recognition of the language in web pages so difficult? Machines don’t “understand” a language. Machines are stupid. Even so-called artificial intelligence is light-years away from the intelligence of a 5-year old. Any human being that knows how to read can immediately identify the languages he speaks, and often also others. But machines –and search engines are just that– need to be programmed to analyze…